Culture

xxx

xxx


The Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods used to all be separate towns, but now exist as part of Denver. Mostly immigrant industrial and meatpacking workers and their families from Eastern Europe originally lived in the neighborhoods. The area is primarily working class and 83% of the population is Hispanic. The NWC plan says it will reflect the rich culture that already exists in the area by displaying historic items and art throughout the campus. A guiding principle of the NWC is to highlight Western heritage by reflecting, respecting and celebrating the meaning of the Western way of life. Without explicitly explaining how, the NWC plan says it will also create the opportunity for all of the people and communities that have lived and worked on the land to tell their stories, including Native Americans and early settlers of the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. The NWC plan also plans to create a gathering space where ideas and diverse cultures can be exchanged, local artistry artistic and creative talent can be celebrated (?), and add art that includes a broad range of cultural expressions.

The Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods used to all be separate towns, but now exist as part of Denver. Mostly immigrant industrial and meatpacking workers and their families from Eastern Europe originally lived in the neighborhoods. The area is primarily working class and 83% of the population is Hispanic. The NWC plan says it will reflect the rich culture that already exists in the area by displaying historic items and art throughout the campus. A guiding principle of the NWC is to highlight Western heritage by reflecting, respecting and celebrating the meaning of the Western way of life. Without explicitly explaining how, the NWC plan says it will also create the opportunity for all of the people and communities that have lived and worked on the land to tell their stories, including Native Americans and early settlers of the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. The NWC plan also plans to create a gathering space where ideas and diverse cultures can be exchanged, local artistry artistic and creative talent can be celebrated (?), and add art that includes a broad range of cultural expressions.


Globeville has a rich history housing the industrial companies and residents that made its surroundings thrive. In the late 1880s Globeville was founded around the Globe Smelting and Refining Company as a place where blue collar immigrants could live and work. The area was settled by mostly Eastern Europeans. Each nationality created its own social organization to foster a sense of community. There were two ethnically mixed business centers in Globeville, a Polish and Slovenian.  Some of these institutions can still be seen throughout the neighborhood, such as Saint Joseph’s Polish Catholic Church. The South Platte River created isolation as it limited the amount of public transportation in the earlier decades. The isolation of the Globeville neighborhood increased with construction of Interstate 25 (I-25) and Interstate 70 (I-70) in the 1960s, creating numerous dead ends and changing how people navigated around the area. A predominantly Hispanic population now lives in the area continuing Gobeville’s history of being a working class community.

Globeville has a rich history housing the industrial companies and residents that made its surroundings thrive. In the late 1880s Globeville was founded around the Globe Smelting and Refining Company as a place where blue collar immigrants could live and work. The area was settled by mostly Eastern Europeans. Each nationality created its own social organization to foster a sense of community. There were two ethnically mixed business centers in Globeville, a Polish and Slovenian.  Some of these institutions can still be seen throughout the neighborhood, such as Saint Joseph’s Polish Catholic Church. The South Platte River created isolation as it limited the amount of public transportation in the earlier decades. The isolation of the Globeville neighborhood increased with construction of Interstate 25 (I-25) and Interstate 70 (I-70) in the 1960s, creating numerous dead ends and changing how people navigated around the area. A predominantly Hispanic population now lives in the area continuing Gobeville’s history of being a working class community.


Elyria and Swansea were two separate settlements during Colorado’s mining days in the 1850s. Swansea became the intersection for the Kansas Pacific railway and the Denver Pacific line in the late 1800s. The railroad allowed for industry to grow around the area, including the Omaha-Grant Smelting Company, creating a blue collar neighborhood. These two settlements joined in 1902. Elyria and Swansea were settled by Eastern Europeans creating services for a diverse community of many nationalities. Elyria and Swansea also became divided due to the interstate system and the construction of Interstate 25 (I-25) and Interstate (I-70) dividing the neighborhoods and creating dead end streets. These developments affected Elyria and Swansea and Globeville equally and split the communities. This area is now home to a majority Hispanic population.   Su Teatro, an organization that founded itself in 1971 aimed to produce art productions that speak to the history and experience of the Chicano/Latino community. They relocated to Denver’s Santa Fe Art District in 2010. The Latino community has created business to reflect their identity such as, Juanita’s Panaderia, and La Pontranca Restaurant. The proposed redevelopments in Elyria and Swansea are driven by not only the expansion of I-70 but also the expansion of the National Western Center and the identity that the city of Denver wants to create for the area. Elyria has 150 homes on 14 blocks, the proposed I-70 project will take out 50 homes from half of the blocks. As the area becomes more prone to redevelopment, and property value rises, more middle and upper-middle class migration may occur into the area.

Elyria and Swansea were two separate settlements during Colorado’s mining days in the 1850s. Swansea became the intersection for the Kansas Pacific railway and the Denver Pacific line in the late 1800s. The railroad allowed for industry to grow around the area, including the Omaha-Grant Smelting Company, creating a blue collar neighborhood. These two settlements joined in 1902. Elyria and Swansea were settled by Eastern Europeans creating services for a diverse community of many nationalities. Elyria and Swansea also became divided due to the interstate system and the construction of Interstate 25 (I-25) and Interstate (I-70) dividing the neighborhoods and creating dead end streets. These developments affected Elyria and Swansea and Globeville equally and split the communities. This area is now home to a majority Hispanic population.   Su Teatro, an organization that founded itself in 1971 aimed to produce art productions that speak to the history and experience of the Chicano/Latino community. They relocated to Denver’s Santa Fe Art District in 2010. The Latino community has created business to reflect their identity such as, Juanita’s Panaderia, and La Pontranca Restaurant. The proposed redevelopments in Elyria and Swansea are driven by not only the expansion of I-70 but also the expansion of the National Western Center and the identity that the city of Denver wants to create for the area. Elyria has 150 homes on 14 blocks, the proposed I-70 project will take out 50 homes from half of the blocks. As the area becomes more prone to redevelopment, and property value rises, more middle and upper-middle class migration may occur into the area.


The River North, or RiNo, Art District is an aging industrial area located near downtown Denver that is slowly becoming a mixed use district. River North is also home to the taxi district and the The Source marketplace, as well as a collection of creative office and residential space, restaurants, bars, and other small businesses. Although at least one recent residential project is aimed towards young families, questions still remain about the ongoing and future availability of affordable and low-income housing and workspace in the area. Ironically, many of those who might be forced to relocate due to increased costs in the area are those who helped to build its popular artistic feel. RiNo’s hip industrial atmosphere is bringing in the trendy crowd in flocks for a unique experience that continues to emerge, to this day. The neighborhood is also becoming home to many breweries and upscale restaurants with a modern feel to them - creating a culture that revolves, in large part, around food and beverages. The neighborhood is bisected by Brighton BLVD, and is a gateway to I-70 and DIA to downtown.

The River North, or RiNo, Art District is an aging industrial area located near downtown Denver that is slowly becoming a mixed use district. River North is also home to the taxi district and the The Source marketplace, as well as a collection of creative office and residential space, restaurants, bars, and other small businesses. Although at least one recent residential project is aimed towards young families, questions still remain about the ongoing and future availability of affordable and low-income housing and workspace in the area. Ironically, many of those who might be forced to relocate due to increased costs in the area are those who helped to build its popular artistic feel. RiNo’s hip industrial atmosphere is bringing in the trendy crowd in flocks for a unique experience that continues to emerge, to this day. The neighborhood is also becoming home to many breweries and upscale restaurants with a modern feel to them - creating a culture that revolves, in large part, around food and beverages. The neighborhood is bisected by Brighton BLVD, and is a gateway to I-70 and DIA to downtown.


Brighton Boulevard will assume a position as a centerpiece and gateway to Denver, both geographically and culturally, under the vision of the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative. Located in the RiNo arts district, this corridor is already a center of artistic and cultural diversity on which the city and developers hope to capitalize through increasingly mixed-use and pedestrian oriented development, as well as by focusing on outdoor and lifestyle attractions, like increased bike and pedestrian access both along Brighton and the nearby Platte river, as well as with a new park along the planned promenade (part of the RiNo plan) on the Brighton side of the Platte. These improvements have been met with fairly positive public and stakeholder feedback and contributions, especially from pedestrian and biking -oriented populations and local business and property owners, who have formed new General and Business Improvement Districts in the area in order to fund the beautification of the city’s “hard infrastructure” improvements (things like curbs, sidewalks, bus stops, traffic signals, etc.).  If done carefully, there is serious potential for this district to become a leading example of cultural, pedestrian-friendly development. However, there are concerns that the prosperity of the area, and consequent rising rents and costs, may soon drive out those artistic and creative elements that helped to make the Brighton corridor, and larger RiNo district as a whole, what they are today. This would, in poetically tragic fashion, represent an economic undermining of the cultural identity and recent history of the area.  

Brighton Boulevard will assume a position as a centerpiece and gateway to Denver, both geographically and culturally, under the vision of the North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative. Located in the RiNo arts district, this corridor is already a center of artistic and cultural diversity on which the city and developers hope to capitalize through increasingly mixed-use and pedestrian oriented development, as well as by focusing on outdoor and lifestyle attractions, like increased bike and pedestrian access both along Brighton and the nearby Platte river, as well as with a new park along the planned promenade (part of the RiNo plan) on the Brighton side of the Platte. These improvements have been met with fairly positive public and stakeholder feedback and contributions, especially from pedestrian and biking -oriented populations and local business and property owners, who have formed new General and Business Improvement Districts in the area in order to fund the beautification of the city’s “hard infrastructure” improvements (things like curbs, sidewalks, bus stops, traffic signals, etc.).  If done carefully, there is serious potential for this district to become a leading example of cultural, pedestrian-friendly development. However, there are concerns that the prosperity of the area, and consequent rising rents and costs, may soon drive out those artistic and creative elements that helped to make the Brighton corridor, and larger RiNo district as a whole, what they are today. This would, in poetically tragic fashion, represent an economic undermining of the cultural identity and recent history of the area.  


The area around the South Platte River in North Denver has historically been an industrial area and a commercial location for the National Western Stock Show and Denver Coliseum. In the last several years, the RiNo Art District has also emerged, promoting a creative, business-centered cultural area.  The 2009 River North Greenway Plan sets out to create an urban culture along the river that reflects the area’s history and one that is more connected to the natural environment with art, architecture, and landscape improvements. This includes adding connections from the river to the Denver Coliseum, National Western Entertainment Area, and Globeville Landing Park. It also includes improvements to Northside Park to become part of the larger Platte Valley Regional Park with proposed additions for a walking/bicycling bridge across the river, whitewater recreation, water filtration, plants and wildlife habitat. Finally, the Plan includes 2-3 additional parks along the river between 20th and 38th street, privately owned plazas and open spaces, moving Arkins and Ringsby roadways away from the river, and another walking bridge to connect the east and west sides. By making the river corridor a place for entertainment, recreation, commercial and residential services, the Plan sets out to connect neighborhoods and create a new sense of community with a more active and safe park environment.

The area around the South Platte River in North Denver has historically been an industrial area and a commercial location for the National Western Stock Show and Denver Coliseum. In the last several years, the RiNo Art District has also emerged, promoting a creative, business-centered cultural area.  The 2009 River North Greenway Plan sets out to create an urban culture along the river that reflects the area’s history and one that is more connected to the natural environment with art, architecture, and landscape improvements. This includes adding connections from the river to the Denver Coliseum, National Western Entertainment Area, and Globeville Landing Park. It also includes improvements to Northside Park to become part of the larger Platte Valley Regional Park with proposed additions for a walking/bicycling bridge across the river, whitewater recreation, water filtration, plants and wildlife habitat. Finally, the Plan includes 2-3 additional parks along the river between 20th and 38th street, privately owned plazas and open spaces, moving Arkins and Ringsby roadways away from the river, and another walking bridge to connect the east and west sides. By making the river corridor a place for entertainment, recreation, commercial and residential services, the Plan sets out to connect neighborhoods and create a new sense of community with a more active and safe park environment.