The Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods used to all be separate towns, but now exist as part of Denver. Mostly immigrant industrial and meatpacking workers and their families from Eastern Europe originally lived in the neighborhoods (1). The area is primarily working class and 83% of the population is Hispanic (2). The NWC plan says it will reflect the rich culture that already exists in the area by displaying historic items and art throughout the campus (3). A guiding principle of the NWC is to highlight Western heritage by reflecting, respecting and celebrating the meaning of the Western way of life. Without explicitly explaining how, the NWC plan says it will also create the opportunity for all of the people and communities that have lived and worked on the land to tell their stories, including Native Americans and early settlers of the Globeville, Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. The NWC plan also plans to create a gathering space where ideas and diverse cultures can be exchanged, local artistry artistic and creative talent can be celebrated (?), and add art that includes a broad range of cultural expressions (4).

1.  City and County of Denver. “National Western Center Master Plan.” 18 Dec 2014: 20. PDF. https://www.denvergov.org/Portals/728/documents/NDCC/NWC_Master%20Plan%20Draft%20121814.pdf [Downloaded on March 6, 2016]

2.  Goodland, Marianne. “The Parable of Gentrification." The Colorado Independent. 04 Nov 2015. Web. http://www.coloradoindependent.com/156024/denver-victims-of-gentrification-fret-for-elyria-swansea-and-globeville-residents. [Accessed on 03 Apr 2016].

3.  City and County of Denver. “National Western Center Master Plan.” 18 Dec 2014: 33. PDF. https://www.denvergov.org/Portals/728/documents/NDCC/NWC_Master%20Plan%20Draft%20121814.pdf [Downloaded on March 6, 2016]

4.  City and County of Denver. “National Western Center Master Plan.” 18 Dec 2014: 52-53. PDF. https://www.denvergov.org/Portals/728/documents/NDCC/NWC_Master%20Plan%20Draft%20121814.pdf [Downloaded on March 6, 2016]