People and Housing

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Migration into Globeville came with Eastern Europeans settling Globeville due to the proximity of work located in smelters, on the railroad, and at packing plants. There are many multigenerational homes in this neighborhood. In the mid 1990s the area started becoming home to many Hispanics due to the same reason a century before; it was an inexpensive area to live compared to the rest of the Denver neighborhoods. It also guaranteed a relatively short commute to work in the city. The population of Globeville is 68% Hispanic, with a younger demographic. 43% of families have children in the area compared to 25% in Denver. The average household income in Globeville is $39,200 compared to Denver’s average of $73,100. A below average household income is the result of  lower levels of education as well as a large Spanish speaking population which may create a language barrier. The redevelopment of the area through mixed-use facilities, along with higher property values may attract middle and upper-middle class residents into the area. The redevelopment projects proposed within and around Globeville will affect the migration of long-time residents moving to different neighborhoods because they may be outpriced with the incoming amenities promised by the redevelopment projects that will attract a new demographic of middle and upper middle class residents to migrate into the area.

Migration into Globeville came with Eastern Europeans settling Globeville due to the proximity of work located in smelters, on the railroad, and at packing plants. There are many multigenerational homes in this neighborhood. In the mid 1990s the area started becoming home to many Hispanics due to the same reason a century before; it was an inexpensive area to live compared to the rest of the Denver neighborhoods. It also guaranteed a relatively short commute to work in the city. The population of Globeville is 68% Hispanic, with a younger demographic. 43% of families have children in the area compared to 25% in Denver. The average household income in Globeville is $39,200 compared to Denver’s average of $73,100. A below average household income is the result of  lower levels of education as well as a large Spanish speaking population which may create a language barrier. The redevelopment of the area through mixed-use facilities, along with higher property values may attract middle and upper-middle class residents into the area. The redevelopment projects proposed within and around Globeville will affect the migration of long-time residents moving to different neighborhoods because they may be outpriced with the incoming amenities promised by the redevelopment projects that will attract a new demographic of middle and upper middle class residents to migrate into the area.


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What is today commonly referred to as the RiNo district is actually within the historic boundaries of the Five Points neighborhood. The Five Points neighborhood is one of Denver’s oldest and most diverse cultural neighborhoods. It began as a mostly African-American community in the late 1800’s. Mexican-Americans, many of whom were seasonal agriculture or brickyard workers, moved into the area in the late 1900’s. Around World War II, Japanese-Americans also settled in the neighborhood. Today, the composition of Five Points has dramatically changed. Residents are primarily between the ages of 22 and 39, and almost 60% of households are one-person. Caucasians make up over 63% of the population, Black/African-Americans almost 18%, Hispanics/Latinos about 16.5%, and the remaining identify as Asian and other ethnicities. While caucasian residents earn, on average, $63,000 yearly, Hispanic/Latino residents average just over $23,000, Black/African-American residents just over $16,000, and Asian residents less than $12,000. Overall, caucasian and Asian residents hold the highest degrees of education. The booming economy has been attracting more and more people to the area. Denver is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, and as the population continues to grow, housing is not keeping up with demand, causing home prices and rents to rise. Housing costs are becoming unmanageable for low-income and moderate-income residents. With the new, trendy offices and apartments being built in RiNo, gentrification is unavoidable. Gentrification can be understood as the process when areas are renewed and rebuilt followed by middle-class people moving in, which often times pushes out poorer residents. Mayor Michael B. Hancock and the Denver Office of Economic Development have publically recognized the need to start addressing affordable housing in Denver, and have released the 2015 and 2016 JumpStart plans which outline ideas for how to do this. An increase in the Denver property tax credit is one proposed way to help with the increasing costs of taxes for property owners.

What is today commonly referred to as the RiNo district is actually within the historic boundaries of the Five Points neighborhood. The Five Points neighborhood is one of Denver’s oldest and most diverse cultural neighborhoods. It began as a mostly African-American community in the late 1800’s. Mexican-Americans, many of whom were seasonal agriculture or brickyard workers, moved into the area in the late 1900’s. Around World War II, Japanese-Americans also settled in the neighborhood. Today, the composition of Five Points has dramatically changed. Residents are primarily between the ages of 22 and 39, and almost 60% of households are one-person. Caucasians make up over 63% of the population, Black/African-Americans almost 18%, Hispanics/Latinos about 16.5%, and the remaining identify as Asian and other ethnicities. While caucasian residents earn, on average, $63,000 yearly, Hispanic/Latino residents average just over $23,000, Black/African-American residents just over $16,000, and Asian residents less than $12,000. Overall, caucasian and Asian residents hold the highest degrees of education. The booming economy has been attracting more and more people to the area. Denver is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, and as the population continues to grow, housing is not keeping up with demand, causing home prices and rents to rise. Housing costs are becoming unmanageable for low-income and moderate-income residents. With the new, trendy offices and apartments being built in RiNo, gentrification is unavoidable. Gentrification can be understood as the process when areas are renewed and rebuilt followed by middle-class people moving in, which often times pushes out poorer residents. Mayor Michael B. Hancock and the Denver Office of Economic Development have publically recognized the need to start addressing affordable housing in Denver, and have released the 2015 and 2016 JumpStart plans which outline ideas for how to do this. An increase in the Denver property tax credit is one proposed way to help with the increasing costs of taxes for property owners.


Brighton Boulevard spans the Elyria/Swansea and Five Points Neighborhoods between 29th and 44th Streets. Driving along Brighton Boulevard, one can see how it has changed from small historic houses to mid-century industrial buildings. Today the Five Points neighborhood is 63% White, 18% African American, 16.5% Hispanic/Latino, and the remaining 2.5% represents other ethnicities. The median income is $63,000 for the White population, $16,000 for African Americans, and $23,000 for Hispanics. The Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood has 6,600 residents, with an average annual household income of $43,000, while 35% of the population is in poverty, as determined by the U.S. Census Bureau. 11% of the population is under 5 years of age, 36% of the population is under 18, and 58% of the population is between 18 and 65 years old.  For additional information on housing changes in the Brighton area, see the impact summary on Time for Brighton Boulevard.

Brighton Boulevard spans the Elyria/Swansea and Five Points Neighborhoods between 29th and 44th Streets. Driving along Brighton Boulevard, one can see how it has changed from small historic houses to mid-century industrial buildings. Today the Five Points neighborhood is 63% White, 18% African American, 16.5% Hispanic/Latino, and the remaining 2.5% represents other ethnicities. The median income is $63,000 for the White population, $16,000 for African Americans, and $23,000 for Hispanics. The Elyria/Swansea Neighborhood has 6,600 residents, with an average annual household income of $43,000, while 35% of the population is in poverty, as determined by the U.S. Census Bureau. 11% of the population is under 5 years of age, 36% of the population is under 18, and 58% of the population is between 18 and 65 years old.  For additional information on housing changes in the Brighton area, see the impact summary on Time for Brighton Boulevard.


The River North Greenway Plan sets out to create a new sense of community in the area surrounding the river while the South Platte Corridor Study predicts increased residents moving in as a result of the proposed construction projects. However, there is no further discussion on how these plan projects will affect the current residents or community. (See Brighton Boulevard and RiNo for more information on current and proposed residential and commercial construction in the area).

The River North Greenway Plan sets out to create a new sense of community in the area surrounding the river while the South Platte Corridor Study predicts increased residents moving in as a result of the proposed construction projects. However, there is no further discussion on how these plan projects will affect the current residents or community. (See Brighton Boulevard and RiNo for more information on current and proposed residential and commercial construction in the area).