Time

The decaying highway built in 1964 has been under review since 2003 when the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) began scoping various concerns from agencies and community members. Soon after, between 2003 and  2004, CDOT then began developing their purpose and need for the reconstruction project evaluating numerous criteria for alternative solutions for repair. When the master list of alternatives was developed they used the criteria to determine which solutions would be eliminated and which would move forward under consideration and further review. This step is called the Alternative Analysis and Screening Process that lasted about two years from 2004 to 2006. These alternatives then made it into the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Draft and were fully evaluated from 2006 to 2008. Once this draft was released to the public, formal comments were accepted between November 2008 and March 2009. CDOT then worked with the public from December 2009 to November 2012 to refine the aesthetics of the alternatives while at the same time meeting the needs of the project and addressing public concerns. After developing reasonable alternatives, a supplemental EIS draft was created including the changes that were made. CDOT released their final EIS Draft January 2016 and extended public comments until March 2, 2016. If the Preferred Alternative is chosen, it will be built in phases. Phase one would commence in early 2017 and remain under construction until 2021.

The decaying highway built in 1964 has been under review since 2003 when the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) began scoping various concerns from agencies and community members. Soon after, between 2003 and  2004, CDOT then began developing their purpose and need for the reconstruction project evaluating numerous criteria for alternative solutions for repair. When the master list of alternatives was developed they used the criteria to determine which solutions would be eliminated and which would move forward under consideration and further review. This step is called the Alternative Analysis and Screening Process that lasted about two years from 2004 to 2006. These alternatives then made it into the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Draft and were fully evaluated from 2006 to 2008. Once this draft was released to the public, formal comments were accepted between November 2008 and March 2009. CDOT then worked with the public from December 2009 to November 2012 to refine the aesthetics of the alternatives while at the same time meeting the needs of the project and addressing public concerns. After developing reasonable alternatives, a supplemental EIS draft was created including the changes that were made. CDOT released their final EIS Draft January 2016 and extended public comments until March 2, 2016. If the Preferred Alternative is chosen, it will be built in phases. Phase one would commence in early 2017 and remain under construction until 2021.


The North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) put out a RFQ (request for qualifications - asking organizations to submit ideas for how the NWC can be redeveloped) in December 2013, and reviewed proposals and interviewed firms in February 2014. A firm was selected, and in the winter of 2014/2015, the Master Plan was introduced. The first quarter was successfully presented to Denver City Council for adoption in 2015. The Master Plan suggests that the entire project be broken down into 8 phases, but it is unclear when the first phase is scheduled to begin. Overall, it’s estimated that the entire NWC project will take ten years.

The North Denver Cornerstone Collaborative (NDCC) put out a RFQ (request for qualifications - asking organizations to submit ideas for how the NWC can be redeveloped) in December 2013, and reviewed proposals and interviewed firms in February 2014. A firm was selected, and in the winter of 2014/2015, the Master Plan was introduced. The first quarter was successfully presented to Denver City Council for adoption in 2015. The Master Plan suggests that the entire project be broken down into 8 phases, but it is unclear when the first phase is scheduled to begin. Overall, it’s estimated that the entire NWC project will take ten years.


Public input began January 2013 with recommendations taken into consideration and placed into the neighborhood plans that were released in 2015. Many of the current projects for the neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea and Globeville have already begun. The public comment period for the I-70 expansion project comes to a close on 3/2/2016.

Public input began January 2013 with recommendations taken into consideration and placed into the neighborhood plans that were released in 2015. Many of the current projects for the neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea and Globeville have already begun. The public comment period for the I-70 expansion project comes to a close on 3/2/2016.


Public input began January 2013 with the recommendations taken into consideration and placed into the neighborhood plans that were released in 2015. Most of the current projects for the neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea have not broken ground with the exception of projects related to the opening of RTD’s “A Line” which connects Denver International Airport (DIA) to Union Station. The public comment period for the I-70 expansion project closed on 3/2/2016.

Public input began January 2013 with the recommendations taken into consideration and placed into the neighborhood plans that were released in 2015. Most of the current projects for the neighborhoods of Elyria and Swansea have not broken ground with the exception of projects related to the opening of RTD’s “A Line” which connects Denver International Airport (DIA) to Union Station. The public comment period for the I-70 expansion project closed on 3/2/2016.


The River North Arts District Plan is estimated to take twenty years, in total. In the Spring of 2001, a workshop for public input was held. The results of this workshop were incorporated into the plan and that was considered the starting point for the River North Plan, as it is today. The plan involves multiple concurrent and overlapping construction projects, over the course of the redevelopment, so it is difficult to determine an exact timeline. Timeframes for each general type of improvement have been estimated as follows:

  • Land use: 2003 – 2012

  • Transportation: 2003 – 2012

  • Pedestrian and bicycle connections: 2003 – 2012

  • Urban design: 2003 -2004

  • Economic activity: 2003 – 2022

  • Environmental conditions: 2003 – 2004

  • Housing: ongoing

The River North Arts District Plan is estimated to take twenty years, in total. In the Spring of 2001, a workshop for public input was held. The results of this workshop were incorporated into the plan and that was considered the starting point for the River North Plan, as it is today. The plan involves multiple concurrent and overlapping construction projects, over the course of the redevelopment, so it is difficult to determine an exact timeline. Timeframes for each general type of improvement have been estimated as follows:

  • Land use: 2003 – 2012

  • Transportation: 2003 – 2012

  • Pedestrian and bicycle connections: 2003 – 2012

  • Urban design: 2003 -2004

  • Economic activity: 2003 – 2022

  • Environmental conditions: 2003 – 2004

  • Housing: ongoing

The planning decisions for Brighton Boulevard street improvements began with a public survey in 2014 that quickly led to a design proposal in 2015. Street construction, which will include new sidewalks, bike paths, and water drainage and landscaping along the street is set to begin in 2016 and could last through all of 2017.  For the last ten years new apartment buildings have been gradually replacing the single family homes in the area surrounding Brighton Boulevard.  There are additional individual development projects that are set to begin construction in 2016 and 2017, but as these are being driven by private developers, their timeline is not public.  The new streetscape and buildings could attract additional construction along secondary streets in the future, providing further growth but also presenting potential conflicts with existing residents and land uses.   

The planning decisions for Brighton Boulevard street improvements began with a public survey in 2014 that quickly led to a design proposal in 2015. Street construction, which will include new sidewalks, bike paths, and water drainage and landscaping along the street is set to begin in 2016 and could last through all of 2017.  For the last ten years new apartment buildings have been gradually replacing the single family homes in the area surrounding Brighton Boulevard.  There are additional individual development projects that are set to begin construction in 2016 and 2017, but as these are being driven by private developers, their timeline is not public.  The new streetscape and buildings could attract additional construction along secondary streets in the future, providing further growth but also presenting potential conflicts with existing residents and land uses.   


The River North Greenway Plan was published in 2009 and did not designate a timeline for its completion. However, some of the projects that were first outlined in the 2009 Plan have been included in the 2013 South Platte Corridor Study, and this study states that completion of such projects is dependent on participation from property owners to sell their property or combine it into a single ownership parcel in order for the City’s redevelopment plans to begin.

The River North Greenway Plan was published in 2009 and did not designate a timeline for its completion. However, some of the projects that were first outlined in the 2009 Plan have been included in the 2013 South Platte Corridor Study, and this study states that completion of such projects is dependent on participation from property owners to sell their property or combine it into a single ownership parcel in order for the City’s redevelopment plans to begin.